Phase One IQ140 – Dry Lake Bed

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Here are some samples of a test I did with my new Phase One IQ140 camera.  It was all shot handheld, some lit with strobes and the rest with natural light.  Feedback is always appreciated!

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CameronFrost_Photography_PhaseOneIA140_004  CameronFrost_Photography_PhaseOneIA140_018

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5 thoughts on “Phase One IQ140 – Dry Lake Bed

  1. That is some camera! The images all look great, although I of course I can’t see 40 megapixels on a Tumblr web page! Maybe post a little 1x crop to show what the sensor is capable of? I am no pro, but I am curious if the perspective provided by the extremely large sensor, or just all that resolution, is what you are seeking for your work. Not knowing any better, I was thinking about a D800 for myself for very high-res stills. Cheers!

    • Hey Bob,
      I just posted a 100% crop for you to check out. There are several reasons I purchased the Phase One. The image quality is incredible and it’s able to capture detail (especially in the shadows and highlights) that you simply can’t with a 35mm. I use the Profoto Air system and with the Phase One LS (leaf shutter) lenses, I can sync the flash at 1/1600th. I like the fact that with the medium format system, the depth of field just has a different look and f/5.6 is comparable to f/2 with my Canon 5D Mark III. It shoots slower and is more challenging to shoot with under most conditions. It forces me to slow down and really think about what I’m doing vs 35mm.

      The cons are obviously the cost, speed and low light sensitivity. It’s really a camera which is best paired with the Profoto Air system (for the flash sync possibilities) and used on a tripod. I will still use my 35mm for a lot of things, but I will definitely prefer the Phase One for slower, more controlled jobs. I hope that helps!

      • Yes! Thank you. That all makes perfect sense. I forgot about blade shutters – even though the Minolta rangefinder I learned photography on (I’m of a certain age) had one. I recall blade shutters had other benefits besides flash sync, too. I’ve never shot a larger frame than 35mm, but I can see the wonderful shallow depth of field yet natural perspective in the Desert photos you posted above. Your explanation has me thinking about eBay to look for an old 120 film camera to experiment with!

  2. Thanks again for the great explanation. I did end up finding a used 120 (6 x 6 cm) film camera on eBay. If this link works, you can see the SF Photoworks scans (unedited, these are the exact files they produce) from a roll of Portra 400 I ran out an shot in my neighborhood the morning the camera arrived to make sure it works. I hope your Phase 1 is meeting all your own expectations as well!

    https://www.dropbox.com/sh/udlrf6b82ntb27w/AbfbTcMkf_

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