Apple Upgrade Adds New Camera Features

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Apple’s recent upgrade to the iPhone 6 boasted a much more dramatic camera update than their iPhone 5s upgrade. This is to be expected, of course, as Apple has traditionally saved their best camera updates for the iPhone 4 and iPhone 5. The latest in the series offers a new sensor, a more advanced image processor, and a quicker focus speed — not to mention the iPhone 6’s bigger screen.

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Latest news about the Iphone 6.

True, Android users have enjoyed the benefit of a larger screen for some time now, but iPhone users will get access to higher-quality photos right out of the box. Thanks to a faster autofocus, the iPhone 6 can actually detect subject distance instantly without that pesky wobble as it searches for focus. If users want to manually control exposure settings, they can easily control settings like focus, exposure, and brightness — all before they take their shot.

For photos shot at night, the iPhone 6 yields noticeably crisper and cleaner images than the iPhone 5. The reason for the reduced image noise is Apple’s move toward a quicker shutter speed and a lower ISO. This is even the case for users running iOS 8.0.1 on their iPhone 5.

Those running iOS 8 on the iPhone 5 (or even 4s) will also enjoy improved search options, image editing abilities, and a limited capacity to retrieve deleted photos. This is not to mention other beneficial iOS 8 updates, like increased battery life, faster shortcuts, Apple’s new Health app, and convenient family sharing capabilities.

Of course, no smartphone is without its fair share of complaints and critics. One article complained about the iPhone’s handling due to its super thin profile and its severely rounded edges. That doesn’t even account for the even larger size of the iPhone 6 Plus, a phone that is too large for most users to fit conveniently in a pocket.

The iPhone 6 camera upgrade is certainly not game-changing, but it is an essential and evolutionary one. Definitely consider upgrading if you are on a model earlier than the iPhone 5s. Some of the new features have come standard on Android smartphones for a while now, but if you want an Apple device, the iPhone 6 boasts the best camera in the company lineup.

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9 Instagram Tips For Photography Lovers

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The Instagram app allows users to quickly and easily snap photos while moving through life. Through these photos, users tell tell stories about their ongoing, day to day experiences interacting with the world around them.

As a new or veteran Instagram user, you might want to learn a few techniques for creating unique photos that will gather “likes” quickly on your Instagram page. You should never shape your Instagram photos around collecting likes. Snap photos when you feel the image will portray a story that your followers will feel involved in somehow. In a sense, the photo should tell a story about your emotions at the time and that you found the memory worth recording and sharing with your Instagram network.

Check out the latest Slideshare presentation to learn more!

 

 

 

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The Benefits of Photography On Therapy

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According to an article recently completed by Psych Central, Rosemary Bannon Tyksinski, PhD and therapist, declares on her website that photography can be instrumental in therapy for certain clients. To her, art is a form of communication. It allows many who can’t directly discuss what’s bothering them to find and express the deeper, underlying issues. Essentially, it allows some of her clients to speak in images, either directly or through the use of a metaphor. For her personally, Tyksinski finds that art allows her to communicate what she sees—things that are important to her and what she experiences. Through expressing these observations, she is able to say things she can’t find words for.

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In terms of completed artwork and photographs, Tyksinski feels that the best photos are ones that evoke deeply buried psychic material—things that her clients may have left hidden otherwise. Through this reveal, clients can find ways to connect with their true selves—parts of their personality that are hidden, but which are vital aspects of themselves.

From this, Tyksinski found her way to photo therapy. At its very core, the practice is the use of photos in therapy sessions, as a means of prompting responses and finding ways to discover the client’s hidden desires and parts of his or her personality. Tyksinski does this through a variety of measures. She typically starts by using photo albums provided by the client—pictures of their own acquaintances, such as important family members, friends and pets. It is important to note that the client did not need to partake in the participation of the photos—either as the photographer or the subject—for this to be successful; simply seeing photos of those who are important to the client could be instrumental in revealing hidden aspects.

In a more generic sense, a therapist can provide photos for their client, in the hopes of awakening some hidden conflict or resolution. Tyksinski mentions several artists she prefers to use—photographer’s who work has prompted many positive results. Matej Peljhan is a psychotherapist and a photographer and, as such, knows precisely what is needed to get the juices flowing in the mind. Maggie Taylor combines her work with a camera and images she can create using her scanner to create “photo montages,” which have shown to be very beneficial in the service of Tyksinski’s clients.

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Take Photos Of People Like A Professional

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Does the idea of photographing people intimidate you even if it’s taking photos of close friends? People can often times be the easiest subjects to photograph once you get over your fear of doing something wrong with the camera. For example, photographing people can be much simpler than taking a photo of a landscape because for landscapes you might have to drive somewhere faraway in order to find a decent landscape and even then the lighting and weather must be ideal in order for the photo turn out well. However, you have absolute control over how you photograph people versus taking photos of landscapes in which you can’t control the elements.

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With people as your subjects, you can control the elements of photography such as lighting techniques and positioning. You also have an unlimited number of subjects at your disposal. These subjects include your friends, relatives and friends of friends. Not to mention each of these subjects is unique and will produce a different type of photograph. You can adjust lighting, the subject’s clothing and makeup as well as location. Imagination is the key to successfully photographing people as subjects. You don’t even need to be an expert on your camera’s settings. Use your camera’s portrait mode in order to take decent photos of other people. Become an expert on your camera settings later. To improve your photography skills, start thinking like a professional photographer would. Here are some tips from a recent article:

Get to Know Your Subject. Start by building a rapport with your subject. You’ll want your subject to feel comfortable with you so that this translates into him or her feeling comfortable in front of the camera. Encourage your subject to be versatile in their movements and positions. If your subject is relaxed, then you will have more success with the photos.

Go Wide with your Lens. The reason documentary photographers and photojournalists like to use wide angle lenses is because it allows them to become intimate with their subjects. The photographer is able to move close to the subject in order to create this sense of connection between the subject and the viewer.

Try Photographing in Black and White. These types of photographs are both artistic and creative. Today, there are many notable portrait and fashion photographers that shoot in black and white.

Take Time to Learn About Lighting Techniques. Direct sun isn’t always great for shooting portrait photography because of it’s potential to cast harsh shadows on peoples’ faces, but overcast skies and late afternoon sun are better.

(Youtube)

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Tips For Snapping Photos With Your Smartphone

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So you have a camera phone, but for some reason every time you attempt to take a photo with it, the picture doesn’t turn out well. With the latest phone technology, you should be able to take high quality images. You should take advantage of your camera phone, but don’t waste your time taking poor quality photos. If you learn a few tips, you will be able to use your camera phone to snap better photos. With only a few, slight tweaks, you can take better photos. When taking photos on your phone, remember basic photography rules.

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Here a few photography tips when using your smart phone.

Use Your Lighting. Before snapping a photo, ensure your subject is facing the light source. This is particularly important when using a smart phone’s camera. Most likely, your phone’s biggest weakness is the inability to take pictures in low light. This is the main reason you’ll want your subject in good lighting.

Clean Your Camera Lens. if your photos are turning particularly blurry, then make sure you remove your phone from the case and clean the lens. You will see an immediate difference in the two pictures.

Stay Away From The Zoom Button. You can always crop a photo later, so why bother cropping while you are taking it? If you want a closer picture of a subject, you should step closer to it. Digital zoom is really the same thing as stepping closer.

Use The Flash Carefully. The flash on your camera phone can be harsh, and more than likely your phone will want to use the flash when it’s unnecessary. In some lighting situations, not using the flash will be a better idea. Snap two photos- one with flash and one without- in order to see which picture turns out better. Another tip for softening your flash is to place a piece of tissue or a white sticker over the lens. The flash will still provide light, but it won’t be so harsh.

Adjust The Camera’s Resolution. Many camera apps have options for adjusting the resolution which allows you to snap photos at different resolutions. If you just want to take a quick picture and send it someone, using a low resolution should work fine. If you want a higher quality photo, use a higher resolution.

(Source)

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New Exhibit Finally Succeeds in Opening at British Council Offices

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According to an article recently completed by The Guardian, a controversial exhibit has finally succeeded in opening at the British Council offices in London. The photography exhibit, completed by renowned photojournalist Nick Danziger, displays eighty one color photographs of a variety of subjects, from ordinary people engaging in everyday tasks, such as a trip to the beach or a day at the hair salon, to eerie commanding figures in uniform. The exhibit is entitled People and Places in the DPRK (North Korea) and will be available for visitation in the British Council in London until the twenty fifth of July.

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The exhibit has struggled to make its way to the United Kingdom, particularly given the sensitivity of tensions and the relationship between North Korea and the west. From the start, Danziger struggled to get photos, often relying on his associate Andrea Rose—head of visual arts at the British Council, to distract the minders from their disagreements on how the process should be brought about. However, once the obstacles were removed, Danziger was pleasantly surprised the ease with which he communicated with his potential subjects. He found that no one refused to speak to him, and that many even spoke English. While no attempts were made to censor his photographs of his choice of subjects, he did note that several potential people did look a bit uncomfortable; when this became an issue, Danziger simply moved on, without a picture. Every image involving any form of text—including banners, posters and even a small notice in the background of a shot taken at a hair salon—was translated and checked in both South Korea and North Korea.

The issues truly started once the exhibition was in transit towards the west. The architects of the project had hoped to bring a Korean farm worker, fisherman, hairdresser and a student with them to the west, where they would attend a workshop as means of training to recreate the exhibit. However, the guests were not granted permits to travel from their own countries and the plan was, therefore, defeated. This very nearly destroyed the chances of displaying the exhibit. However, Graham Sheffield, the British Council’s director of the arts, insured its success and continues to push to communicate with Japan, China and many other national locales in the hopes of carrying the exhibit to further places in the future.

(Youtube)

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Properly Holding A Digital Camera

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Often, new digital and sometimes even film photographer have issues of “camera shake” when they take pictures. Camera shake could lead to somewhat blurry images because the photographer fails to hold the camera in a steady enough position when the camera shutter is depressed. One way to eliminate this problem, particularly in low light situations, is to use a tripod when taking photos. For digital camera users, one method used is to hold the camera away from the body in order to frame the shot. Although the body is stable, the farther the camera is held away from the body, the greater the chance the body will move or sway sideways and therefore trigger camera shake.

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The Digital Photography School offers a few key tips for those using digital cameras in order to minimize camera shake and its effects. The only way to full alleviate the problem of “camera shake” is to use a tripod in order to fully stabilize the camera. A simple way to stabilize the camera is by using both hands to hold it in place. Your inclination might be to shoot one-handed, but to avoid “camera shake” you should stick to holding the camera with both hands.

Tip #1: Always grip the right hand end with your right hand. Place your forefinger gently on the shutter release while your other three fingers are wrapped around the front side of the camera. Hold the camera firmly with your right hand but not too firmly to avoid shaking the camera.

Tip #2: You should usually place your left hand under the camera in order to fully support its weight and keep it from moving around.

Tip #3: By using the view finder to line up the shot, you’ll hold the camera closer to your body which will stabilize the camera’s position. When using the LCD, try not to hold the camera too faraway from your body. Tuck in your elbows and lean the camera out somewhat away from your face.

Tip #4: Lean against an object. For extra stability, try to find a large, heavy object to brace yourself against in order to keep you from swaying or to keep your hand from shaking. If your body remains still while taking the photo, the image shouldn’t come out blurry.

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